Tagliatelle Pasta Recipe

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Have you ever been curious about making pasta?

I was curious lately so I thought I’d do some research and give it a try!

It turns out, pasta making ranges from complicated pastas that require lots of skill to super easy recipes (like this one) which are perfect for any beginner.

Tagliatelle is a long flat noodle that is made by rolling out pasta dough. The dough is then folded on itself and cut into thin strips. When the strips are separated and dried, you have fresh, delicious homemade tagliatelle noodles you can swirl on your fork for a mouthful of simple, rustic Italian decadence.

Homemade pasta has the advantage of rough sides which grip more sauce in each bite!

Since Mother’s Day is right around the corner, I opted to use my great grandmother’s scalloped pasta roller to cut my tagliatelle noodles. Even though my great grandmother died when Mom was 5, Mom has tons of memories going to her grandparents’ house. Italian ladies usually do all their cooking in the basement, and my great grandmother was no exception.

Mom, as a tiny girl, used to sit on the steps that went down to the basement and keep her grandmother company while she used this little roller to cut ravioli. She would give my mom a bottle of 7-Up and a straw, and Mom would watch her move like lightning across a huge sheet of rolled homemade pasta. This was a tradition every Saturday.

Nowadays, we keep this tradition on Christmas Eve by eating ravioli. I’m sure Mom still thinks about her Nonna.

I have been reading and studying all about pasta for weeks. Pasta is basically anything you can imagine. Pasta making is sentimental, creative, physical, engages all your senses, and on top of that, is an activity that is both relaxing and rewarding. No wonder so many people do it.

I’m still learning about pasta. What I know for sure, though, is that the BEST kind of pasta is:

shared.

Here is my recipe for pasta dough and the steps required to make this scalloped tagliatelle. I hope you’ll try it for lunch or dinner sometime!

Buon Appetito!

Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Scalloped Tagliatelle Pasta

Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time5 mins
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: Pasta

Ingredients

  • 2.5 cups einkorn wheat flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp olive oil

Instructions

  • In a large bowl, mix flour and salt. Stir with a fork to evenly disperse salt.
  • Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture. To this, add eggs, egg yolk, water, and oil.
  • Use a fork to puncture egg yolks and beat eggs. Slowly incorporate flour until shaggy dough forms.
  • Turn bowl out onto a lightly floured surface. Mix dough together to combine everything. Knead dough thoroughly for at least 10 minutes, stretching it as much as possible and using the heel of your hand to push it around.
  • After 10 minutes, dough should be silky and elastic. Form a dough ball. Place ball on wax paper or lightly floured parchment paper. Cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let dough rest for 10-30 minutes.
  • After dough has rested, cut dough ball in half. Use a rolling pin to roll out a pasta sheet of desired thickness. Allow sheet to dry for 2-3 minutes. Flour the dough sheet before cutting.
  • Use a knife or a rolling cutter to cut noodles. I like to use a ruler as a guide. I used a scalloped rolling cutter, hence the name "scalloped" tagliatelle!
  • Separate noodles with your fingers and place on a floured surface, a flat drying basket, or a floured teacloth.
  • Drying options: Hang noodles to dry on a hanger or pasta drying rack, gather approx 100 grams of noodles (what you would serve as one portion) and shape into nests–let these dry on a floured or wax-papered sheet and freeze, or cook them and enjoy them right away.
  • To cook: drop pasta in plenty of salted boiling water. Keep watch! These should only take a few minutes to cook. The best way to know if pasta is done is to take out a noodle and taste it!

Notes

A pasta sheet, rolled out and placed on a cutting board (since my countertop isn’t scratchproof)
My great-grandmother’s scalloped dough cutter! This little tool helped her make ravioli every Saturday, and my mother has fond memories of this as a small girl.
Freshly cut tagliatelle noodles!
The antique wheel is pretty wobbly; a ruler helps me have a guide to make fairly straight lines of noodles .
Drying tagliatelle
Finished tagliatelle wait on a clean teacloth until it’s time to cook them for dinner!

Want More?

Here’s a playlist to help you get in the mood while you’re kneading that pasta and cutting those noodles!

Ready to Make Your Own?

Here are some links to products that can bring pasta making into your home. These are affiliate links, which means if you do happen to purchase by clicking them, Amazon will send me a penny or two so that I can continue making posts. Thank you so much for your support, and for letting me share my new pasta passion with you!

The next generation of Nonna’s pasta cutter.

This cutting board is special because it has a lip that hangs over the edge of your countertop. Perfect for kneading pasta dough, since the lip prevents the board from slipping around at all!

Ok, so maybe we can’t be like Nonna every night of the week. A pasta maker machine helps things go along with speed–plus gives jobs for kitchen helpers like spouses or children.

This doubles as a shaper for gnocchi as well!

Books

Even the covers look delicious!

Pasta Inspiration

Salty Seattle has plenty of vibrant and delicious looking how-to’s on her channel
I absolutely LOVE the Pasta Grannies channel. A lady hosts an independent documentary show where they TRAVEL AROUND ITALY AND VISIT GRANNIES WHO MAKE PASTA THE REAL WAY. Holy ravioli. Not only does that sound like a dream job, each video is so sweet and wonderful–even if you aren’t going to make pasta, these grannies are going to cheer you up on any given day.
Chef Pasquale is the whole shebang. In this video, he shows you how to make his ravioli dough, but he’s got all kinds of recipes for sauces and accompaniments for all your future pasta masterpieces.

I could go on and on in this post, but I won’t….all this talk about pasta has made me HUNGRY! I gotta go cook something.
Buon Appetito, and happy cooking!

Love,

Maggie

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Biphasic Sleep: I tried it for a week!

Here’s a breakdown of my progress during my exploration of biphasic sleep.

Thursday
Daytime: wakeful the entire day.
Bedtime: 8PM
Nighttime Wakefulness: Nope. Slept through the whole dang thing.
Takeaway lesson about my sleep: I seem to need more of it than I’m getting.

Friday
Rise Time: 4:30AM. Felt rested, felt great!
I loved being up before the sun, before the day began. I did chores, wrote, did schoolwork, had a huge workout, shower, and completed an entire beauty routine all in the morning.
Midday Rest: Slept 1.5 hours.
I woke up feeling as though I had slept a whole entire night all over again. I woke up feeling as though it surely must be sometime in the evening, and it blew my mind when I checked the phone and saw it was only noon!
I had a hugely productive afternoon doing grad work, author work, and entrepreneur work. I gassed up the car and felt rested and almost optimistic about things. Also, my appetite was really normal! I didn’t need an afternoon snack, or even a pick-me-up in the form of a soda or a cookie.
Bedtime: 11PM, after staying up to have a late dinner and watch some television.
Nighttime Wakefulness: Nope, I slept through the whole dang thing tonight as well.
Takeaway: Quality rest produces a quality work/home/life/mood day.

Saturday
Rise Time: 7 AM. Felt groggy. Really needed some coffee.
This morning I felt a little directionless and very cranky. I wondered if it was due to insufficient planning for the day or if it was because I was yet again on my older schedule. I lamented a little bit–now that I had gotten a reminder of what it felt like to be rested, it was a little frustrating not to get to enjoy that today. I decided to go to the gym to let off some steam.
My appetite was off the charts. I ate sugary foods and pre-packaged ramen–anything that could be ready quickly.
Midday Rest: I tried to see if I could repeat yesterday’s success with a nap, but I was restless and couldn’t settle my mind down.
Bedtime: 8:30PM. Tossed and turned from being too sore and from starting (unwisely) to think about wedding planning instead of writing down ideas to think of later.
Nighttime Wakefulness: Wasn’t able to fall asleep yet, so I put on some old YouTube Videos of Mother Angelica to help me drift off to sleep with happy thoughts.
Takeaway: I need to train myself to have a sense of completion about my day, and to give my mind permission to let things go when it’s time to settle down and rest.

Sunday
I did not log my sleep today.

Monday
Rise Time: 7 AM. Hit “snooze” a few times. Got up and had to hurry. Today was a good day, as I got to visit with friends, and house-cleaning efforts left the house still in pretty good shape today.
Midday Rest: Had a short snooze in the very late afternoon. Woke up groggy, but otherwise in a good mood.
Appetite was huge today! I had three-bean salad with olive oil and tuna, and it really hit the spot. Also, I was pretty thirsty today.
Bedtime: 9PM-ish. Eugene and I like to look at funny articles together and comment about them until we get sleepy.
Nighttime Wakefulness: Nothing yet!
Takeaway: Maybe I have recovered after several days of good sleep, and I no longer really need bed by 8:30 PM. I feel my clock changing and natural waves of sleep beginning to emerge.

Tuesday
Rise Time: 5:30 AM. Naturally woke up at this time, but still wanted to rest a little more.
Midday Rest: I did take a nap for about an hour.
Appetite: Was good, not great. I think considering symptoms of Long-Distance, I was doing pretty darn well today.
Bedtime: Around 10. Felt a natural wave of sleepiness, which allowed me to drift off pretty quickly.
Nighttime Wakefulness: STILL nothin’! It’s like I am needing and using every moment of sleep that I’m getting.
Takeaway: When I am going through waves of coping, more rest, and more meaningful rest, seems to be beneficial in helping me get through it.

Wednesday
Rise time: 6 AM. Hit the snooze button a bunch.
Midday Rest: Didn’t want one. I was plenty satisfied following right along with the work day, going right into grad schoolwork and author work, even working through lunch.
Appetite is normal, maybe a little on the low side. I had a slice of bread and butter for breakfast, and several cups of green tea. My body seems more interested in the warm tea than in anything else.

Takeaway for the Week

I’m more convinced than ever about the benefits of adequate sleep. It’s also fascinating to note my body going from needing an extreme phase of recovery, to now starting to fit into a natural sleep rhythm from about 9:30 to around 5 or so in the morning. Anything outside of those hours seems to make it inevitable that I’ll either need a nap, or will likely hit “snooze” more often than I should.

Perhaps when I’m not feeling so mentally taxed, I won’t need such extreme amounts of sleep. It’s a theory. In the meantime, my plan is to continue to nourish good, healthy sleep habits.

Summary: Did it help me at all?

I initially wanted to know if following a biphasic sleep pattern would improve the quality of my life and my mental health. Here are what I’m measuring and how I’m doing, now that I’ve been practicing this sleep pattern for a week.

  • Sleeping through the night: IMPROVED. Not only am I sleeping through the night, I feel as though I have been getting extra sleep that I’ve sorely needed, probably due to the current mental load my brain is dealing with.
  • Enough energy for daily demands: IMPROVED. Not perfect, but at the very least, I’ve had time every day for health, hygiene, paperwork, author work, schoolwork, social time, and extra things like putting on makeup and keeping up with chores.
  • Extra energy for working out and/or tackling projects: IMPROVED. I have started having enough energy for longer, more intense workouts every day.
  • Relief from depression-like symptoms: MILD IMPROVEMENT. Im still experiencing some blah’s, but having enough sleep has helped me with finding words to communicate with loved ones, and for prayer as well.
  • Appetite (not over- or under-eating): IMPROVED. I’m the type who will either eat too much, or forget to eat at all. Having enough sleep has helped me naturally enjoy healthy food, plus feel satisfied with small, consistent meals.
  • Naturally-occurring pattern of two phases of sleep per day: NO IMPROVEMENT. Not only was I sleeping through the night each night, I often found a ton of rest in midday naps this past week. Whatever it is that I’m recovering through psychologically, I clearly have needed the recuperation.
  • Peaceful time of wakefulness during the night where I could spend time in prayer and meditation without distraction: NO IMPROVEMENT. I’ve been sleeping, seemingly round the clock! BUT, lll
  • Productivity; in other words, the amount of work I am able to accomplish every day: HUGE IMPROVEMENT. As much as I’ve been sleeping, I feel as though I’ve accomplished 10 times as much as I usually do, and without being over-stressed or strapped for emotional energy afterwards.
  • Memory; the amount of information I am able to retain: IMPROVED. I’m currently studying for exams, and actually starting to feel more confident about them. A little.
  • Synthesis; the quality of my ability to think about what I am learning in school, and to synthesize ideas and discussions from it: IMPROVED. This has been a huge week for developing more creative ideas in my studies, in business, in writing, and I’ve even been able to help encourage others who are developing their ideas as well.

Well I’m convinced.

So typing up my experience and the improvements I’ve seen, it’s pretty clear that this has been a beneficial exercise for me.

I can feel my body naturally craving sleep at different times–and hey, that’s a huge step too, right? It’s a big accomplishment to know what being sleepy actually feels like, much like someone who overeats has to learn the difference between physical and emotional hunger. Now I know when I’m sleepy. So I just go to sleep.

In the coming week, I hope to have more regular times for sleep. I have a feeling that the exercise aspect of my routine is directly related to the quality and quantity of my rest. Perhaps as my body gets accustomed to physical recovery, the mental aspect of rest will be something that will be more routine as well? Plus, I’d really like to get to a point where I am so “caught-up” with rest and recovery that I actually naturally do get to enjoy some quiet nighttime hours of repose, prayer, and thoughtfulness. I’m looking forward to that a lot.

Margaret Nelson is the founder and contributor to Maggie O’the Valley, and author of THE TEN MINUTE QUIT, available on Amazon

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March: At a Glance

When I got back from Argentina at the beginning of the month, I knew I’d be hitting the ground running, what with getting ready for the last leg of my graduate program, planning a wedding, and finding time to actually figure out what it is I want to do with my education.

You know me; I’ve always got several dozen kooky ideas cookin’.

Here are my big blocks of life goodies this month:

Lent

This Easter will mark two years since my Confirmation in the Catholic Church. I have been trying to have a deeper experience, and a closer encounter with Christ. I really believe this is such an important season–one that helps me remember the things that are truly important in life.

In my opinion, there has never been a better time to be Catholic. Why? Because there is some serious, SERIOUS work to do. There has never been a greater opportunity to rid the church of corruption than there is now, much thanks to social media. There has never been an easier time to access tons of information about living liturgically. There has never been a more mind-blowing time to consider life in a day and age when technology is infused into so much of our experience, and yet we physically encounter our God, who comes to us in the form of bread so that we can look at our God and not die.

Transubstantiation, counter-cultural lifestyles with focuses on mysteries, the environment, contemplating/tracing/participating in life force all the way back to its source, AND sweeping out some long-standing villainy in an all-out battle of good versus evil–one in which WOMEN are keepers of mysteries that prove time and again how they become better leaders of warriors the more womanly they are? Catholicism is so metal.

If you’ve ever wondered what Catholics actually believe, I think these are available on Amazon for about $8.

Long-Distance

They say absence makes the heart grow fonder…well, since Eugene and I are currently almost 7,000 miles apart, you can imagine that I am feeling pretty darn fond of him at the moment. Long-Distance anything is terribly difficult. I’m hoping to write more posts about it, with the prayer that they might help other people who are going through the same thing.

Yes, it’s a blessing. We have learned so many things from being long-distance, and I have to believe we will use these lessons for the rest of our lives. It’s not for the faint of heart, you guys! But when it’s with the right person, there’s no amount of miles that can separate or jeopardize your relationship. True Love is always easy…no matter how hard it is :P.

Buenos Aires, Image (C) 2017, Margaret Nelson. Do not use without permission.

Finances

You know. It’s tax season. Crippling student loan debt. Visas are expensive. After visa, we’re gonna be newlyweds, which traditionally means utilizing lots of financial strategies for setting up a new life and a new home. For me, it’s really a race against time–can I complete my degree and get going on a passionate and meaningful career before the car wears out? Can I find somewhere to do digital job-interviews so I don’t have to go buy new dress pants? How many dollar store Pop Tarts is too many dollar store Pop Tarts? How often do people actually need dental work, anyway?

Image from Pexels.

Wedding Bells

Speaking of finances, wanna know what every immigrant wants to do immediately upon entering the United States? Why, pay for a customary, over-the-top, North-American wedding, of course! Let’s just say that Eugene and I have been having several strategy meetings lately about how to keep The Big Day focused accepting God’s will for our vocations, on our love, with warmth and welcome for all our family, and without breaking the bank. Stay tuned for the things I discover in my foray through the Pinteresting charybdis that is THE DIY WEDDING!

Image from Pexels.

Oh Yeah,

And I’m in grad school. Pray for me, guys.

Image from Pexels.

Margaret Nelson is the founder and contributor to Maggie O’the Valley, and author of THE TEN MINUTE QUIT, available on Amazon.

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It’s a Big World, After All

And get ready to hit the road with me and Eugene!

Being in a multi-cultural, international relationship means really getting those airline miles, but we’ve also managed to find trains, boats, and taxicabs as well.

On deck soon: a road trip up the California coast (since the rest of the state has basically been on fire lately). After that, we’ll be heading down south…way, way south. I’m talking South America.

Did I mention being a digital teacher is kind of the best job ever?

God has blessed me with such an amazing man. Together we have opened each other’s worlds to so many new horizons and adventures! It seems so amazing to me when I realize the extremes: from back home in my little valley town to all over the globe…it’s a roller-coaster! But, I guess that’s life, yes?

Here are some photos from our first vacation together in Buenos Aires, back in 2017!

(C) 2019 Margaret Nelson

All photo images in this post are owned by me. Copying and/or use by persons other than myself or Eugene is strictly prohibited.

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